main navigation


 

Breadcrumb navigation

You are here:
  1. Home
  2. | Press
  3. | Press Releases
  4. | 2013
  5. | EU Ranking: comparison of members' Investments in rail Infrastructure

EU Ranking: comparison of members' Investments in rail Infrastructure

Press release 08.07.2013
 

EU Ranking: comparison of members' investments in rail Infrastructure

Germany falls behind on network construction

©iStockphoto/pixelprof

Berlin, July 8, 2013. Compared with its European neighbours, Germany invests much too little in its railway network. According to calculations made by the German transport organisation the Pro-rail Alliance and the business consultants SCI Verkehr, Germany achieves only a low ranking in comparison with other selected European countries. The ranking shows the per capita state investments in the rail infrastructure for 2012. The list is headed by Switzerland, with 349 euros spending per citizen, followed by Austria, with spending of 258 euros per person. Both alpine states have for years budgeted for greater spending on rail infrastructure than on the roads. But network construction is also booming in other countries: Sweden invested 151 euros per capita, followed by the Netherlands with 129 euros and the UK spending 110 euros. Policy makers also sent out clear signals in favour of rail infrastructure in Italy (79) and France (63), whereas Germany is danger of losing touch with its European neighbours. Out of all the countries examined, only recession-hit Spain (38 euros) spent less on its rail infrastructure than Germany.

 

Per capita state investment in railway infrastructure
in selected European countries in 2012. Figuren in euros

 
Per capita state investment in railway infrastructure in selected European countries in 2012. Figuren in euros.

Source: Allianz pro Schiene based on figures supplied by BMVBS (Germany), VöV (Switzerland), BMVIT (Austria), SCI Verkehr GmbH. Flags: iStockphoto.com / Faye78

 

"The low per capita spending demonstrates that Germany is on an alarming, go it alone course when it comes to transport policy," said the managing director of the Pro-Rail Alliance, Dirk Flege, on Monday in Berlin. "Unfortunately, a comparison of the last several years shows that this is not a unique case but a long-term trend." In addition, Germany also spends considerably more money on road construction than on railway infrastructure, criticized Flege. His recommendation for the federal government is to look at the good example set by the other European countries. “As transit countries, Switzerland and Austria are carefully getting their rail networks ready a transport modal shift from the roads to the railways. In the meantime, there is a very real threat that Germany will gamble away its chances for shifting a large part of its transport needs on to the railways in the future..” Flege called for state funding in the railways to be increased quickly. Germany must spend at least one and a half times the amount that it has been spending in the recent past if we want to remain competitive with other industrial countries,” said the Pro-Rail Alliance managing director.

 

State investments in railway infrastructure compared with the roads
in Europe’s main transit countries in 2012 (roads investments = 100%)

 
State investments in railway infrastructure compared with the roads in Europe’s main transit countries in 2012 (roads investments = 100%)

Source: Allianz pro Schiene based on figures supplied by BMVBS, VöV, BMVIT. Flags: iStockphoto.com / Faye78

 

“The financial and economic crisis in Europe is now starting to be reflected in state funding for the railways. In spite of this, many countries are spending more money per citizen on their networks than Germany does,” said Lars Neumann from SCI Verkehr. “However, it is not only in Spain where we can see an increasing tendency for budgetary politicians to reduce funding for investing in, and maintaining, the railways. In times of crisis, policy makers like to repeatedly question every euro they spend on the railways before approving it.” Although economic development has been considerably more positive in Germany than in many other countries in Europe, “it has become apparent that investments in the domestic railways is stagnating.”

 

Dr. Barbara Mauersberg
Press Officer

phone: +49 30 2462599 20
mobil: +49 162 211 53 64